The countryside line

The Region of Waterloo’s Countryside Line is a boundary that protects the cultural, economic, and environmental heritage of our rural lands from the pressures of urban sprawl.

It protects the distinctiveness of rural communities at a time when other cities in Ontario are annexing rural areas for suburban expansion.

The municipal election is happening this October 22, 2018. Your local elected representatives have a huge influence over how Waterloo Region will develop over the next 4 years.

We have asked each candidate whether they will Hold The Line. View their responses below.


Region of Waterloo

Region of Waterloo – Chair

Jan d'Ailly | jan@dailly.ca | www.dailly.ca

Response submitted August 15.

General Answer

Thank you for reaching out. First of all, I just wanted to let you know that I am in great favour of the hard Country Line, and when I was on Waterloo City Council from 2003 to 2010 was a leader in getting the Laurel Creek Headwaters ESL established. In fact we made a video at the time. https://twitter.com/jandailly/status/1025000873116590080

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes, absolutely. The ‘Places to Grow Plan’ which was developed in the Region and then used as a model by the province guided the hard countyside line. The approach helps ensure that farmland and environmentally sensitive lands immediately surrounding the urban areas maintains its current land-use status, and promotes higher density living in the urban corridor. Future Official Plans must build upon and strengthen the concept of the hard countyside line, and work towards strengthening it against any hint of potential development.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

First, I would like to speak to what I have already done to help protect the Waterloo Moraine. When I served on City Council from 2003 to 2010, I was heavily involved in resolving the environmental issues surrounding the rezoning of the west end lands. Part of that effort was to initiate a process with the Region to protect the Moraine based on land use, and at the same time recognize that the lands being proposed for development had a clay till which does act to help project the ground water. This initiative lead to the formation of the Laurel Creek Environmentally Sensitive Landscape., and this model was then used to project other environmentally sensitive areas in the Region. During this process, the City of Waterloo removed about 550 acres from potential development in order to protect the moraine. I am extremely proud of the impact that this work has had in protecting sensitive landscapes in the Region. I will continue to defend attempts to dilute the strength of these environmental protections.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

The Place to Grow Official Plan clearly sets out where the developable lands are for residential, commercial and other uses for the three cities and in the townships. The City of Waterloo has for all practical purposed already reached its outer limits, whereas both Kitchener and Cambridge still have many greenfield opportunities, and some remain in Ayr, Baden, Elmira, St Jacobs and Wellesley. Further development must within these boundaries, with no expansion beyond the countyside line.

Jay Aissa | jay@jayfencing.com |

No response provided yet.

Robert Karl Deutschmann | rob@deutschmannlaw.com | www.robforchair.ca

Response submitted July 29.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I will work with Regional Council to defend the countryside line. As a former mayor of a rural municipality, I recognize how important the countryside line is to our community. I also applaud your efforts in continuing to keep this issue top of mind for the community through your efforts.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

These protections are a collaborative effort including the Region and advocacy groups in our community. The Region of Waterloo does an exceptional job of ensuring the protection of prime agricultural areas and especially ensuring that we have quality drinking water. I am not aware of a need, and I do not see a need to change the approach that the Region of Waterloo has taken with respect to these issues. I also note that the Region of Waterloo strongly defended its position with respect to the amount of developable land to be added to the Official Plan. I was a member of Regional Council when we worked to come to a resolution of the issue with the developers after the OMB sided with the developers against the Region. The Region fought the issue and the result was a resolution that was beneficial to all parties involved. Protection of the country side is maintained and there is sufficient land provided for future development in our Region.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

I believe that the Region has laid out a plan for new development. The construction of the LRT/ION has provided a strong anchor that will support significant intensification growth throughout Kitchener and Waterloo. Cambridge would see similar intensification growth when the LRT is extended into Cambridge. The combination of continued intensification in the cities, along with controlled and planned growth as provided through the negotiated OMB resolution, provides a solid framework for new development for many decades to come. With respect to the Region’s future beyond 2031, we will have to engage many interest groups in our community to assess where the Region is heading and what we will need to ensure that we continue to be a growing and prosperous region that recognizes the importance of well planned growth for our urban cities and preserves our rural assets.

Region of Waterloo – Cambridge Councillor

Rob Brunette | |

No response provided yet.

John Florence | JohnFlorenceNOW@gmail.com |

Response submitted August 21.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

JOHN FLORENCE Believes YES ....With YOUR SUPPORT

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

JOHN FLORENCE States: REMEMBER the Nursery Rhyme about The Wolf & the 3 Pigs ? When Developers come Knocking ...We Need to be Very Careful WHAT DOORS WE OPEN!..For a GREEN Future The Region Must NOT put an Expanding Tax Base ahead of Protecting Our Environment,Our Heritage Land & Our CHILDREN'S ,childrens future

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

JOHN FLORENCE VISION : “Through the EYES of a Farmer!” With YOUR SUPPORT Doing My / OUR Due Dilligence

Helen Jowett | |

No response provided yet.

Karl Kiefer | |

No response provided yet.

Jeffrey Shaver | jeffreyryanshaver@gmail.com |

Response submitted July 30.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes, we need our growth to happen upward. More condos and intercity development

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Avoid building in those areas, expansion of drinking water protection areas.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

We need to plan for transit, urban density in condos townhomes and appartments making up majority of new builds

Region of Waterloo – Kitchener Councillor

Elizabeth Clarke | e-clarke@live.ca | http://www.elizabethclarkeregionofwaterloo.com

Response submitted July 30.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/EClarkeYW/status/1023955243703459840

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

With the recent change in our Provincial government, I fear that our countryside line and our Regional Official Plan may indeed be under renewed threat, and I believe that Regional Council must defend both vigorously. Wildlife, including many species at risk, depends on our moraines and wetlands for survival, as we do for our clean drinking water. These important landscapes play a critical role in controlling flooding and erosion, storing carbon, facilitating recreational opportunities and providing many social and cultural benefits, and they must be protected.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Inefficient development and climate change pose the two greatest threats to our agricultural lands, the moraine, and our drinking water. Waterloo’s Regional Official Plan is a strong policy document. Prior to the implementation of its Growth Management Strategy, our development was 65% greenfield and 35% intensification. Those percentages have now reversed, and we’re exceeding our targets for development in built-up areas, thanks not only to our enforcement of the countryside line, but also to initiatives that include our brownfield incentive program and, of course, our new light rail transit. The Provincial Municipal Comprehensive Review requires that our plan now be updated, and this update will provide an opportunity for Council to enhance and strengthen the plan. We must continue to do our part to combat climate change, and we can do that through pursuing new initiatives such as our Community Energy Investment Strategy, our partnership with municipalities and local utilities companies that helps local residents and businesses save on energy, keeps energy spending local, and identifies cleaner more sustainable sources of energy. We must maintain the funding we provide to the University of Waterloo, to support its environmental research. And we must strive to meet our new Greenhouse Gas Action Plan target of reducing our emissions by 80% of 2010 levels by 2050. Shifting resident travel away from single occupancy vehicles to public transit and active transportation will be critical to our success.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

In 2017, our population reached 600,000, a two percent increase since 2016. We’re growing faster than the province and the country, and this trend is expected to continue. Welcoming newcomers while protecting the environment will require land use planning policies that guard against urban sprawl, prioritizing intensification of built up areas with a variety of higher-density housing options, and that promote mixed-use ‘complete communities’ with walkable built environments. Environmental assessments that ensure that as growth occurs, it considers all environmental as well as social and economic impacts, must be conducted. And Waterloo Region must provide infrastructure, including public transit, that is supportive of these goals.

Tom Galloway | tomjgalloway14@gmail.com |

Response submitted September 4.

General Answer

As the current Chair of the Planning Committee, one of our proudest achievements is the development of the award winning Regional Growth Management Strategy (RGMS). In response to the Provincial Places to Grow Act, we worked quickly to develop a plan to deal with the growth the Province told us to plan for. Within the RGMS there were a few key pillars that were designed to control growth in a controlled and strategic manner. The Countryside Line is the cornerstone of the Strategy. At the time of the RGMS residential development was by units 65% greenfield and 35% intensification. Along with rapid transit, the other key pillar, we now can already boast a reversal of those numbers; 35% greenfield, 65% intensification. The two pillars work hand in hand.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I am already on record in defending against challenges to the Line and dealing with potential adverse amendments to the Official Plan. I supported significant resources to defend the OP during the last Appeal process. Council has recently authorized the statutory review of the OP and while that will now occur over a period of time, it is likely new challenges will be launched once revised. I will do so in the future.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

the Regions OP and RGMS are very protective of prime agricultural areas, moraines,drinking water etc., however, more specifically I support the establishment of additional Environmental Sensitive Landscapes (ESLs), a made in Waterloo Region response to these issues. I am very proud of our ability to work collaboratively with landowners and township Councils in this regard. We have fairly robust planning policies within drinking water well areas that restricts problematic uses. We need to continue them and enhance where necessary. We need to continue and strengthen other Source Water Protection programs through our own efforts and those of the GRCA that are designed to avoid or mitigate contamination opportunity. I have been a member of the Water Efficiency Committee since being on Council. This Committee, that has citizen and business representation, seeks ways to to reduce demands on our water sourcing, treatment and distribution system. This effort is intended to eliminate the need for any future great lakes pipeline. These water efficiency efforts is the demand side protection of our drinking water resources.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

The RGMS and OP lays this out. We are planning and I support we grow with intensification/ brownfield development as the primary focus rather than greenfield development as the primary focus as in the past. The advent of rapid transit and specifically LRT is driving this transition. Even before trains are running we see the reversal already taking place. We need to keep moving forward on Phase 2 LRT to Cambridge to drive this transition there as well.

Michael D. Harris | michael@michaeldharris.ca |

No response provided yet.

Tom Hiller | tjh.hiller@gmail.com |

Response submitted July 30.

General Answer

It is rarely appropriate to answer with absolutes to such questions. However, I can say that I do support the Official Plan and I have the greatest of respect for the concerted efforts Ken Seiling made as Regional Chair in support of it, our agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine and the protection of our drinking water. Given the opportunity to serve as a Regional Councillor, I would be well guided by his record and beliefs. That said, development is integral to existence and how economic needs are met determines our standard of living - they must be addressed as they arise. Regardless, I believe the protections in place now for all of the above must remain strong and that the erosion of them must be guarded against. Intrusions and amendments would have to have very compelling arguments to allow them to occur. Our finely balanced urban / rural character is cherished and critical natural resources will not be risked. Those are promises, and they are principles.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Jason House | jasonhouse2018@gmail.com | www.jasonhouse.ca

Response submitted July 29.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

This city services upwards of 5 separate and unique generations of citizens. All with varying ideas of how this city should build up or build out. City sprawl is a raging debate globally, not just locally. Ontario produces only 70% of food that it consumes, there is a deficit to what we make vs. what we eat. I am sympathetic to that. But those who speak louder do not get the right to drown out the voices of those who simply disagree with them. So if you are asking me how I would vote? I would look at each proposal as a unique and individual situation that requires thought and planning. Something I would expect from any politician. Not to think and decide with one's emotional state of mind on any given Sunday! To deal in absolutes regarding an issue that has such a broad perspective is unreasonable for either side of the fence. Discussion for each proprosal is the answer. Some people prefer the city center lifestyle while others prefer the suburban environment. I will fight to ensure that everyone in this city is represented and that each proposal is looked at in a fair and logical way. I would expect nothing less from anyone.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I would consider the Moraine to be one of the most important areas of the Waterloo Region. The nearby subdivisions and potential for intruding winter road salt is to say the least not smart planning. Harming an environment that services over 300,000 citizens with clean drinkable water is also not logical. Building subdivisions isn't wrong. Building them where it impacts vital organs that service the existing city is critically poor planning. It's not too late to do something and as such I would very much fight to help move forward a Waterloo Moraine Protection Act. It's just common sense! At the same time I would work with the developers to seek alternative solutions.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

This is such a simple question covering such a broad topic. Our Environment is important and should be enhanced and protected through direct discussion and coordination with the community. Our Urban centers always have room for improvement while looking outward at our countryside lines for protection. A balancing act of sorts providing effective urban planning, mass transit and an economy that can sustain these goals. Community involvement whether through simple verbal discussion or personal action is required to maintain the city as a whole. There is however no one answer to suit every situation the Waterloo Region will encounter. I am a common sense person and will always approach everything I encounter with my accumulated learned experience to date. There is room for everyone and every voice in this Region.

Geoff Lorentz | geoff.lorentz@rogers.com |

No response provided yet.

Ted Martin | tgmartin13@gmail.com | www.tedmartin.ca

Response submitted August 7.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/TrusteeTed/status/1023724975017140224

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I will definitely defend the countryside line. I last ran for Regional Council -- in 2003 -- largely on preventing urban sprawl. I am pleased that the Region (despite my absence from Council ;-) has worked hard to protect our rural areas and promote urban intensification within the boundaries of the existing settlements; however, especially in light of the musings of our new Premier, I fear the next four years will see renewed pressure to allow "development" (aka destruction) of our green spaces, so electing municipal politicians who are committed to environmental issues is vitally import.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

The next council needs to strengthen our commitment to intensification of the community cores, preservation of our rural and environmentally sensitive lands, and promotion of alternatives to automobiles, while also working to strengthen our neighbourhoods. If we create neighbourhoods that are good for pedestrians and cyclists, we create a community that is vastly more livable and vastly more condensed. Every decision Council makes should consider the true environmental (and social) costs and benefits. We should support local businesses, products and agriculture, prioritize the preservation and restoration of our natural environment, and promote reduction, reuse and recycling programs and industries.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

If we want to keep our cities and towns from spilling over their boundaries, we need to accommodate more people within those boundaries and find ways to contain the waste they generate. To accommodate more growth, we not only need to ensure that we build mixed residential areas, with supportive and affordable housing, units for first-time buyers and down-sizers, places for seniors to age at home and for families to raise children, with parks and green spaces, bike lanes and walking trails, shops and cafes, but we also have to find ways to reduce our creation of garbage and consumption of fossil fuels. We also need to promote local agriculture and encourage buying local produce, to get urban dwellers to appreciate our rural areas and join the fight to protect them.

Fauzia Mazhar | fauziamazhar65@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Kari Williams | kariwilliamswr@gmail.com | www.kariwilliams.com

Response submitted August 21.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I will defend the countryside line against threats to the protections in place. Even a loss of a tiny species can have far reaching impacts and I think a lot of people forget that and focus on profits and development first. I want to find ways to balance both protection and economic growth and ensure that our region is able to thrive.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

All three of these things are very important. Protecting agricultural and natural areas isn't always easy, but committing to vote against any proposals for development over protected boundaries is a first step that I would take. I think educating the public more on why these areas are so important to our region would also help with keeping councilors accountable at all levels and would encourage our population to actively. The move to incorporate the use of renewable fuels and reducing emissions is great and I want to work toward expanding these types of programs. Drinking water is very important to all residents. Reducing salt use over the winter months even more is one way to help. Doing this will require creative solutions to keep our community members safe while outdoors.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

I think new development is necessary. New infrastructure and buildings are inevitable with a growing population. I want to see a continuation of the strategy that has been used over the last term of building on existing built lands. There are lots of areas that are still undeveloped or underdeveloped and could be used to help with the low occupancy rate and shortage of affordable housing in the region. Building to attract new businesses in these types of areas will also be important. Rezoning these existing areas to accommodate development may also help protect natural areas critical to our drinking water.

Region of Waterloo – Waterloo Councillor

Jim Erb | info@jimerbwaterloo.ca | jimerbwaterloo.ca

Response submitted July 30.

General Answer

Ontario’s Greenbelt was created 10 years ago to protect two million acres of land where agricultural, economic and environmental opportunities could co-exist for generations of Ontarians. Within the last year, the provincial government has initiated a review of the Greenbelt with the possibility of expanding its’ boundaries, which would include Waterloo Region. The expansion of the Greenbelt into Waterloo Region should be seen as an exciting opportunity with a win-win outcome. Currently the Greenbelt, which is the largest environmentally protected area in the world, offers Ontarians benefits of human health, improvements in agriculture, protection of bio-diversity, economic gains and buffeting the effects of climate change. The most significant part of the Greenbelt review that could effect Waterloo Region is to ensure that the measures already put in place by the Region do not get “watered down” to ensure that the designations currently in place, such as the countryside line, to protect agricultural land and water are maintained. Other jurisdictions in Ontario have not been as diligent as Waterloo Region and it is crucial that new policies developed by the Province do not weaken the level of protection and existing boundaries that protect farm and environmentally sensitive land. The Greenbelt review is a winning proposition if the existing policies put in place by Waterloo Region are maintained. We will see protection of our farmland and natural, biodiverse and sensitive areas. It will further protect our watershed, create new opportunities in eco-tourism, provide funding to protect and enhance natural areas for recreation and habitat and allow farmers the chance to take advantage of the Greenbelt funding which they can use for innovative ideas related to farming and land stewardship. This is a legacy project – protecting water, land, air and health for generations to come. Environmental protection in Waterloo Region deserves………. https://twitter.com/JimErbWaterloo/status/1024395468896256000

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I fully support that the current boundaries of the countryside line be maintained. This has been the hallmark of sound and creative planning in Waterloo Region which needs to be maintained.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

One of the main areas where we can work to the protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water is to respond to the current review that has been initiated by the Province of Ontario to expand the Greenbelt. It is important that we do not “give up any of the measures” that the Region has put in place to protect our Region.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Planning for new development needs to be a co-ordinated effort between the Region and lower tier municipalities so both municipalities share similar goals. As we continue to build residential housing in the cores of municipalities, we need to determine that the developments do not impact existing single family homes and that any new development has adequate open space so young families will be willing to relocate into residential developments that are part of intensification.

Jane Mitchell | janemitchell@bell.net | www.janemitchell.ca

Response submitted August 19.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Absolutely

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I am the past-chair of the GRCA, so yes I work to protect the agricultural areas, the moraine and drinking water. I fought for the Environmentally Sensitive Landscapes. I voted for and support the Regional Official Plan that created the countryside line. I will continue to support it as we move into the update over the next few years.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Waterloo Region is intensifying by going up and infilling. There are still plenty of greenfield land in the urban areas. The ION must have stage 2. Improvied transit in the core is already creating intensification. Bike lanes and pedestrian access as well as complete neighbourhoods also save the agricultural areas. I will defend the countryside line. There has been some backlash from a few people who say the cost of housing is going up due to the restrictions on creating suburbs out into the agriculture areas. This is not true. Prices are increasing due to people coming from Toronto for jobs and commuting. Asking if they want all of Waterloo Region paved usually shuts it down.

Bob Oberholtzer | |

No response provided yet.

Sean Strickland | sean@seanstrickland.com | www.seanstrickland.com

Response submitted August 25.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/SeanSstrickland/status/1023414470033334272

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I was part of the council that passed the Regional Official Plan in 2003 that created the concept of the "countryside line" . I have continued and will continue to support this planning concept in order to focus our growth within the existing urban boundaries. I am proud of regional council's progressive approach to managing our growth that maintains our countryside and protects our groundwater. Since 2003 and several updates to the Regional Official Plan since then I have remained, and will remain, steadfast in my support of the countryside line.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

By maintaining the country side line and focusing the growth of our community within existing urban boundaries we are protecting prime agricultural areas and our drinking water at the same time. It is however interesting to note that farming practices are sometimes in conflict with protecting our drinking water and agricultural run off can have a negative effect on water quality. I will also continue to support programs that help farmers keep their cattle out of our streams and waterways and further protect our drinking water. I have also supported several measures to improve overall water quality by spending money to upgrade or waste water treatment plants, water Infrastructure and lawn watering guidelines that protect our water supply.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

We need to keep on the path that we are currently on by maintaining the countryside line which helps our community to "grow up and not out" . With the construction of the ION we have already seen the success of this approach. Our skyline has changed considerably in the past 8 years with more high rises constructed, and more to be constructed, in our community's history. With close to $2 billion in new multi-residential high rise development in the past 5 years our policies are working. We do however need to do what we can to make sure this new growth stays within our defined urban areas and also that ensure adequate affordable housing remains part of the overall housing mix. I will continue to Cate for policies that focus our growth within our existing urban boundaries as defined by the Regional Official Plan

Beisan Zubi | beisanzubiwr@gmail.com |

Response submitted September 4.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I will. I don't want to see urban sprawl taking over our Region. I'm originally from Ottawa and the way that it spread out over and around our greenbelt was a planning disaster.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I will make sure as our Region grows that we continue to value our environment and ecology by making sure we're thoughtful about land use, conserve our resources, support our agricultural sector and educate the Region on the benefits of a robust and protected countryside line.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

I think we should look towards building up existing neighbourhoods with mixed-use residential builds, intensify the downtown and uptown cores and look at how we connect infrastructure in a way that makes sense, from public transportation to bike lanes, we can work with what we have to improve our urban experiences. We should also look at easy ways to improve urban-rural circulation by a variety of different methods so that urbanites can discover our beautiful countryside and those looking to live in quieter areas can also access local businesses and cultural events.


Cambridge

Cambridge – Mayor

Doug Craig | buddycraig318@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Randy Carter | randycarter05@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Colin Tucker | cctucker@rogers.com |

No response provided yet.

Ben Tucci | tucci.ben@gmail.com | electbentucci.com

Response submitted August 10.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I/we will defend it. Every decision we make going forward will be guided in part by the philosophy I believe in, that of the triple bottom line. That is, how does the development/decision impact the environment, the social fabric of our community and, the fiscal bottom line.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

As per above.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

New development = additional taxpayers = offsetting for existing taxpayers the otherwise tremendous impact on them of the ever increasing costs of providing every day services required. This means actively marketing for and attracting new development with allowances in each new development of a % of units geared to affordable housing. It means building up not out but does not massive skyscrapers. The developments need to respect the areas surrounding them. I propose forming advisory groups for business, for builders and developers and for landlords and tenants just to name a few. The intent being to understand from the very people that we expect to deliver part of the solution for affordable housing shortages, what red tape is in the way preventing these investments. Doesn’t mean throwing money at them but does mean understanding the nuances.

Cambridge – Ward 1

Ryan O'Hagan | ryan@ryan-ohagan.com | www.ryan-ohagan.com

No response provided yet.

Clifford Vanclief | Cliffordvanclief@gmail.com |

Response submitted September 7.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

As Cambridge Ward 1 Councillor, I will defend the countryside line from any amendments or updates that threaten current protections. Having areas for agriculture and green spaces to enjoy is crucial for the Region. Before any new amendments are made I will make sure the do not affect the line in a negative way

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I will work to protect agricultural areas, the Waterloo Moraine and our drinking water by ensuring future developments do not invade or disturb these areas. I will continue with and enhance current legislation for winter maintenance, agricultural and industry run off and location of future developements to protect drinking water and/or agricultural areas. I would also like to see our City continue in the direction of subdivision developement that supports active living while minimizing the effects from rain water run off.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

As our Region grows we have to continue planning with the concept of growing up not out. We cannot continue with the urban sprawl we are witnessing across Ontario. Transit will have to be designed to reduce our dependence on the automobile. We are moving to a new age where our dependence on the car will decrease. As we grow up and not out we will need the local farmers and markets more than ever, this is why we must protect the fertile lands.

Donna Reid | donnaereid@rogers.com |

No response provided yet.

Peter Crystal | pcrystal@rogers.com |

No response provided yet.

Stewart Allan | stuallan@sympatico.ca |

No response provided yet.

Cliff Eggleton | cliffeggleton@gmail.com | www.choosecliffEgg.com

Response submitted July 30.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

All Land use and the future development of farm lands or any protected areas are not a decision to be made quickly. I do not support urban sprawl and believe we need to reconsider how we use and develop the land we presently have and how to redevelop or rezone areas within our communities that already exist.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Prime agricultural land along with its appropriate use and management is extremely important to the Waterloo Moraine along with the Pairs / Galt Moraine. I believe we have to support sustainable agricultural systems and processes that don’t negatively impact our drinking water along with appropriate winter road maintenance to limit impact to all ground drinking water.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Waterloo Region along with our lower tier municipalities must work together and consider all the impacts from new and ongoing developments in our communities, neighbourhoods and lands we need a focus on how these developments impact our environment and make decisions accordingly

Cambridge – Ward 2

Mike Devine | devine.mk@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Jeff Richardson | richardson4ward2@gmail.com | @Richardson4w2

Response submitted August 3.

General Answer

First I have to say I believe that the Region of Waterloo and the municipalities contained within have done a fantastic job through their official plans to hold the line. I can’t imagine that newly elected representatives are going to start walking back on the good work that has already been done.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I will certainly work to maintain the intent of the current official plans in place. I believe Waterloo Regions was adopted in 2009 and Cambridge in 2012/13. I believe their would be considerable opposition related to weakening the current protections in place and I can’t see the various municipalities being in support of these types of changes.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I believe we need to maintain the moraine to ensure adequate recharge of the aquifer, we should also give consideration to the amount of discharge that is occurring and the future growth of discharge on both a commercial/industrial and residential basis. We also need to ensure that if the surrounding moraine’s are pulled into current Greenbelt legislation that we maintain any greater rights and protections that we have currently.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

I believe most urban planners are moving away from urban sprawl and are designing walkable multi-use communities within close proximity of public transit. It is clear that there are transit gaps in many parts of the region but I believe as these gaps are closed appropriate development will occur.

Jaanus Kimsto | jaanuskimsto@hotmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Jay Edward Brown | jb1970@live.ca |

No response provided yet.

Cambridge – Ward 3

Michael Mann | mm361@bell.blackberry.net |

Response submitted July 29.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

As virtually a life long resident of Cambridge and the region, I have a strong appreciation for the unique blend of urban rural mixture that Waterloo region offers. The blend of high tech industry, world recognized education facilities and rich agriculture farmland, and the rivers that run through it, make Waterloo Region a destination point for many. I absolutely will defend the countryside Line!

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Protection measures include intensification, not sprawl, wise and informed decisions about future development whether industrial, commercial or residential must be made to protect our natural resources. Education measures are require to help others realize the gem that the region is and that everyone has a responsibility to ensure we protect what we have for future generations. If we do it right, they will follow and improve on our lead.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

As stated we are growing up not out, with intensification taking place. Most communities have abandoned buildings and brown fields within their borders. We must develop incentives for reuse of these facilities.

Tracy Hipel | hipel4ward3preston@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Patricia Bercowski | patriciabercowski50@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Cambridge – Ward 4

Gary Price | garyprice@sympatico.ca |

No response provided yet.

Jan Liggett | jkliggett@rogers.com |

No response provided yet.

Cambridge – Ward 5

Pam Wolf | pam_wolf@rogers.com |

No response provided yet.

Bill Kirby | votebillkirby@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Brett Wagner | brett.wagner.web@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Cambridge – Ward 6

Kurt L. Ditner | kditner@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Stephen Davis | steve.davis.wcp@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Sandy Falkiner | sfalkiner@rogers.com |

No response provided yet.

Cambridge – Ward 7

Frank Monteiro | fmonteiro351@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Ryan Coles | treecamps@gmail.com | youtube.com/c/treecamps

Response submitted July 30.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I think that the protection of our country side, farmland and nature areas is of the upmost importance and I will defend against the amendments and updates to the Official Plan. I think that studies have shown the damage caused by urban sprawl and the harmful effects to the future that would not be a wise investment in the long run. I do feel there should be small allowances for sprawl under curtain conditions and after expert review and much considerations.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I will do everything I can to get involved, educate and influence our city and region to get involved and see the value in our natural and agricultural lands as well as the aquifers and drinking water awareness.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

"Growing up instead of growing out" What a great slogan! Simple yet, deep and meaningful. Growing up instead of growing out is how I would like to see development happen in the future. I'm a big advocate of community paths and public transportation. Thank you for contacting me. I'll see you at your 2nd annual festival in September.

Connie Cody | ccody.ward7@gmail.com | https://sites.google.com/view/conniecody4council

Response submitted September 4.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I will be a strong advocate against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken the countryside lines. Protecting the countryside line is integral for a healthy and sustainable lifestyle. We need to meet the needs of the present without compromising the needs of future generations.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

For over 6 years, I have been bringing awareness and encouraging protection to areas that are being threatened by amendments to the Official Plan. I support greater protection of our farmland, greenspaces, forests, wetlands, watersheds and the Waterloo Moraine. We need to ensure strong protection of clean water sources as the Region continues to grow. By supporting protection, I will be able to play an important role in wetland conservation, particularly through the development of municipal official plans and bylaws that protect these sensitive ecosystems within our jurisdiction. Alongside the Region and the Province, we can work together on the Regional and Provincial policies to help guide growth that better protects our natural areas.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

The City of Cambridge in partnership with the Region of Waterloo and the Province could consider a "No Loss" protection plan that will create stronger wetland and clean water policies to protect, conserve and sustain for future generations, making the Waterloo Moraine, wetlands and drinking water sources a clear priority. We must work together to help guide growth and be a strong voice in protection.

Cody Botelho | |

No response provided yet.

Cambridge – Ward 8

Nicholas Ermeta | |

No response provided yet.

Kenneth R. Bartlett | bartlett_64@hotmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Carla Johnson | Carla@CarlaJohnson.ca | www.CarlaJohnson.ca

Response submitted August 1.

General Answer

I am an avid believer in the importance of building up, not out. I am an avid believer in the importance of public transit and densification allows public transit to be more effective and less costly. I also believe that densification increases community spirit which is essential to our mental and emotional well-being. I will work on council to be a voice to ensure we make responsible decisions that will allow our children and grandchildren to live in healthy, protected environment.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?


Kitchener

Kitchener – Mayor

Jiri Marek | |

No response provided yet.

Steinman, Myron Daniel | |

No response provided yet.

Vrbanovic, Berry | berryv@outlook.com |

No response provided yet.

Kitchener – Ward 1

Davey, Scott | scottdavey@gmail.com | www.scottdavey.info

Response submitted July 30.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I will absolutely continue to defend the countryside line. Not only is it mindful of agriculture and the environment, but it's far more sustainable from a purely financial perspective for municipalities to build up, instead of out. My comments and voting record over my 8 years on City Council consistently reflect this fundamental belief.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

While Kitchener City Council has little jurisdiction (or zoned areas) of agricultural land, where Councillors are personally liable is safety in drinking water. Kitchener is already a widely recognized leader in sustainable funding for runoff water. This will ensure the safety of our drinking water into the future. I have voiced concerns about excess road salt use in the past and will continue that fight going forward.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

This is the trick. Not only are we going to face pressure from those that would stand to benefit financially from developing past the countryside line, but we will also be charged with impeding affordable housing. The simplistic (if not accurate) argument will be that dwindling greenfield-development supply will increase demand and therefore drive housing costs up. To fight this, we must embrace building up. We must embrace intesification and work diligently to separate nimbyism from legitimate concern, especially in areas near rapid transit. It's difficult to sometimes side with residential towers over the wishes of established residents, but this is where politicians with integrity must do what's right over what's popular. Failure to properly support intesification in the core will inevitably lead to a breaking of the line that we do not want to see breached.

Marcus Drasdo | marcus@osvisual.com | marcusdrasdo.com

No response provided yet.

Susan Stark | susanastark@gmail.com |

Response submitted August 15.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes. My grandparents lived in Bloomingdale when I was young and thankfully, that area has maintained its quaint feel, as have the other towns surrounding it. We have to make sure that we to not use agricultural or natural woodlands or wetlands for building. I will stand with anyone who is for maintaining our beautiful countryside...and the history that goes with it.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

#2 is a bit tricky as the Region is in control of the groundwater and only the Mayors sit on Regional Council. I am not sure that councilors even have a voice that the mayor takes into these meetings. I would be quite interested to find that out.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

We have to get better at re-purposing the buildings that we currently have...some are standing empty and get dilapidated so we tear them down. I believe this is a waste of resources. Someone just said that the greenest building is the one already built. To a dWe have the space in our cities if we use it wisely. We might have to change some zoning to allow residential in some areas but we can identify opportunities. We have to get better at engaging residents and organizations like yours for input that offers different perspectives.

Stretch, Stephanie | steph.e.stretch@gmail.com |

Response submitted August 17.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes, the countryside line should be maintained and I will commit to its defence. Our economic development plan is part of our region's identity and the health of our rural areas is vital to my understanding of our rich community.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Urban sprawl is to often a result of economic policies applied without care. Consideration for the land that sustains us, the water we drink and the air we breathe should bear significant weight where the growth and health of our region and the good of its citizens are concerned. I will commit to being a voice for the countryside and the local environment as a member of our municipal government.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

I favour a nuanced approach of urban intensification that includes building up instead of out, reimagining older industrial builds as new housing complexes, "granny" suites and small houses, and by sharing space as a resource that we all have a right to. Access to affordable housing and and smart builds that account for our shared environment are also crucial components of a livable, enjoyable city that we love to live in and will be proud to invite others into.

Kitchener – Ward 2

Brusse, Regan Sunshine | sunshine4ward2@gmail.com | https://www.regansunshinebrusse.ca/

Response submitted July 29.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/ReganBrusse/status/1023591549463089152

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I entered this election with concern for exactly this; ward 2 sits on the outskirts of our community and aligns the waters edge and the farmland that lay between Cambridge and Kitchener. Though I recognize the need for urban development to decrease the scarcity of affordable housing, I find it imperative that we also consider the effects of our actions and decisions on the ever-diminishing bordering lands, some of which are owned by farmers, and others too, such as those that line the riverways of our region.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

The best I can do to aid in protection is with my actions and my vote within Council. My decisions will reflect my desire to gear our region towards environmentally sustainable activity and growth for both Ward 2 and Kitchener.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Dense urban construction with proper bikeways and safer street lanes. Green spaces and urban gardening plots available for all and well integrated for sustainability within our community. No more subsidies for developers. Insist upon maximum affordable unit implementation and minimize offsets. Require such from any who wish to build within our community. Period.

Schnider, Dave | daveschniderward2@gmail.com | daveschnider.com

Response submitted September 5.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes. For the sustainability of our environment, our drinking water and to protect the way of life we're accustomed to. It's great to have such a strong rural and agricultural presence and the benefits they provide surrounding us.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Where Kitchener is able to have the most say in this is with our drinking water. In Kitchener around 80% of the water we consume is groundwater. Continuing and furthering the reduction of water use through conservation and the Region's rain barrel program is important. A little conservation by all of us adds up to a lot. For prime agricultural area and Waterloo moraine protection, intensification that grows up, not out is the key.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

The LRT route has already sparked development and will continue to do so. These developments need to have housing options for all income levels. Incentives to provide affordable, attainable housing options should be part of new developments. Amenities for residents need to be along the LRT route or at a walkable distance. Gentle or smaller level intensification larger homes can be converted into multiple units needs to be encouraged as well.

Vanderpool, Fitzroy | fitzthewhip1@hotmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Kitchener – Ward 3

John Gazzola | jgazzola@rogers.com | johngazzola.com

No response provided yet.

James Howe | jameshowe@rogers.com | jameshowe.ca

Response submitted August 22.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes! I am a long time advocate for the countryside line. I also support having it included in the Green Belt so long as that it retains the protection of Region of Waterloo’s Official Plan when that is stronger.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I support the City of Kitchener’s approach to stormwater management that strives to have as much stormwater handled on the property it falls on so it does not carry pollutants into the storm sewer system and ultimately into our water system. I think the city should look at expanding the measures that homeowners and property owners can use to qualify for credits to the stormwater utility fee. Large trees, naturalization of lawns, depaving and plastic or concrete grid systems are among the options to consider adding. Larger credits or incentives to help pay for improvements can also help increase participation and significant diversion of stormwater. As an environmentalist, I am open to learning about how we can do more to protect prime agricultural areas and the Waterloo Moraine beyond the protections provided by zoning.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

I strongly support intensification within walking distance of the central transit corridor and near iXpress routes. In Kitchener, intensification requires implementing the Planning Around Rapid Transit Stations (PARTS) Plans zoning as soon as possible and in the meantime taking it into consideration when zone change applications are requested. This development needs to include affordable housing particularly for families and people living on low incomes.

Paras Solanki | paraskwc@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Robert Souliere | rsouliere@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Kitchener – Ward 4

Julie Batista Geary | m.j.geary@rogers.com |

No response provided yet.

Wes Hill | wesroberthill@gmail.com |

Response submitted August 3.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

As a long time local restaurateur who believes in, and depends on fresh locally sourced ingredients, protecting our farmlands and green spaces is of primary importance to me, as both a family man and a local businessman. In all matters pertaining to amendments and updates to the official plan, my voice on council will prioritize the protection and enhancement of our precious natural environment. Our futures depend on clean air, water, land, healthy green spaces and well nurtured sensitive environmental features.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

As your direct voice to regional decision makers, I will work closely with direct, and indirect, stakeholders to bring new options and ideas to the discussion tables and to the decision making process. There are always ways to turn barriers into opportunities. My voice on council will focus on encouraging the setting of policies and procedures that factor in the full present and future societal cost of any activities affecting our agricultural areas, drinking water, -- and certainly -- the Waterloo moraine. Through open, cooperative and civil discourse with the many knowledgeable voices in our community, as well as with my elected colleagues in our region and neighbouring regions, I will work to make sure we don’t lose sight of getting the basics of protecting our air, water, and farmland right — ensuring our region is at the forefront of innovation and sustainability.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

As Ward 4 councillor I will approach all discussions pertaining to new development planning with the view that development must meet present needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. As always, it is imperative that we do not fail to get the basics of protecting our water, air, and farmland needs right. This means we must include the combination of environmental and economic good in all planning initiatives. Sustainable innovation will be key moving forward to ensure quality of growth for all sectors.

Sasha Sidhu | sashasidhu2@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Kitchener – Ward 5

Aizad Ahmad | aizad423@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Andres Fuentes | fuentesforcitycouncil@gmail.com | andresfuentes.ca

Response submitted August 18.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes. I believe that protecting rural land is crucial to the health and success of our community. I recognize the importance of having this land for the environment, our drinking water, and our food security. I am a strong believer in aiming for denser development over sprawl.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

It's important to recognize the value of these areas as beyond just the development potential they have. The contributions they make in terms of providing local produce, helping regulate the temperature, ensuring the health of our aquifers, and providing great places for bike riding and other recreation. I am focused on protecting the sustainability of our city and the protection of these areas are central to that vision

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

I believe in density over sprawl. Beyond protecting these agricultural and rural areas, it also makes providing transit and other services more efficient. I also believe that we need to focus on ensuring that we have a diversity of housing options at varying price points, ensuring that we have affordable housing. The Region's Countryside line is an important tool to prevent unlimited sprawl and I think we need to stick to it.

Sonal Pandya | sadasukh0728@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Kitchener – Ward 6

Paul Singh | paulsinghward6@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Narendra Grover | dr.nkgrover@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Kitchener – Ward 7

Hanna Domagala | hanna@hannadomagala.ca | hannadomagala.ca

Response submitted September 9.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

It was my pleasure to help implement the Region's "Regional Growth Management Strategy" which focused on reurbanization and defining our growth areas. I will continue to advocate for balanced growth as our decisions will impact us, our children and generations to come.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Most important is people's understanding of our water resources. There is more education to be done in this area. Similarly, understanding what factors impact our rural areas and water, is key to making good decisions.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

It should plan sustainably. I believe in a healthy balance, understanding people's varying needs as they progress in life, as they have different incomes and priorities. As someone who has been educated in Architecture, works in construction management and has also worked for municipalities and with developers for years, I offer a unique perspective of understanding all sides at the "development table". Our region will grow and people will continue to need options and affordability. I can put my design, planning, creative and negotiation skills and experience to ensure all stakeholders are consulted and best options selected.

Bil Ioannidis | bil.ioannidis1@gmail.com |

Response submitted September 4.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I have never wavered in protecting the country side line or supported any amendments to the official plan that threatens to weaken its protection. In fact, I have been one of the biggest advocates for intensification on city council.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I will continue to support intensification, reduced parking along the transit corridor and support other methods of transportation. I support any initiative that will protect our drinking water and support all regional policies in that regard.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Support all initiatives that help the ION flourish in our community. Again promote intensification in our city, promote other modes of transportation and create new modes or development that supports work, live, play within a 5 min walking distance.

Dharmesh Patel | dhshpatel@yahoo.com |

Response submitted August 1.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/dhshpatel/status/1024681401994465282

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

although it's complicated and overjurisdiction matter involving province and federal I will advocate to make firm act to protect it Waterloo Moraine Act. At municipal and region level do my best to clear cut define rules to protect it.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Most of west part of Kitchener and Waterloo is important for drinking water for region, to protect it I will advocate to minimise the urbanisation on Waterloo moraine. Make policy to reduce salt use in winter to protect underground water. as alternative use beet juice as ice melter. (like other municipalities use it). Instead of zoning change in agriculture land will support for Uptown project in town. Stop or frieze a aggregate excavation . Development should be away from sensitive recharge areas

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Support 2 way all day Go train, Uptown and high-rise development to protect protected land. maximum use for current infrastructure and land. growth should occur; (ref Lindsay Poulin) In areas where already built up areas exist on the Moraine In areas close to major transportation networks (ex. Highway 8, 401) In areas where known water and aggregate resource can be extracted and developed Away from sensitive recharge areas Away from natural areas that provide habitats and linkage areas for animal species In areas already close in proximity to necessary amenities (grocery stores, gas stations etc.) and; In areas extending beyond the boundaries and buffer zones of the Waterloo Moraine

Kitchener – Ward 8

Zyg Janecki | zyg.janecki@rogers.com | zygjanecki.com

No response provided yet.

Margaret Johnston | margaret.anne.johnston@rogers.com | www.margaretjohnston.ca

Response submitted September 4.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes, I will defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan. I value farmland, meadows and countryside. Once they are gone, it is next to impossible to get them back. They are integral to our environment, food safety, natural habitat for animals. Intensification needs to happen within our current zoning.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

By protecting against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten these agricultural areas. I am one generation away from our family farm and realize the importance of farmland to the safety of our food and water supply.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

By zoning our current neighbourhoods for sustainable, smart intensification to handle the many new residents we are expected to have come to our Region in the next few years.

Kitchener – Ward 9

Melissa Bowman | melissabowmanward9@gmail.com | www.melissabowmanward9.ca

Response submitted Jusy 30.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/m2bowman/status/1024097629112819712

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I believe planning and design that includes walkable streets, varied and dense housing, and transit options create a vibrant and dynamic city. This type of planning and design also protects important environmental and agricultural assets in our community such as the countryside line. Kitchener is creating and/or updating many new policies that impact growth, planning, and development such as the Residential Intensification in Established Neighbourhoods Study, the Comprehensive Review of Zoning By-law, and Planning Around Rapid Transit Stations. We need to ensure that as these policies are developed or reviewed that they discourage urban sprawl and include protections for the countryside line and Waterloo moraine.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

In addition to advocating for the countryside line, I would seek out best practices in protecting the moraine and our drinking water system. I would actively engage with those familiar with these issues and work with other levels of government to ensure our drinking water is safe and protected. I appreciate the approach of the Hold the Line festival as it educates people about this asset through celebration and appreciation of its importance to our community. I already have my ticket and am looking forward to celebrating the countryside line this September!

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

As our Region grows, we need to look at ways to intensify well. Numerous documents and policies are currently in place (or in process) that direct our growth plan. Policies such as Ontario’s Places to Grow Act as well as local policies including the Residential Intensification in Established Neighbourhoods Study and Kitchener’s Urban Design Guidelines encourage us to build up and fill in, rather than grow out. By focusing our growth on infill, providing a wide variety of housing options throughout the city (not only in the core), and building upwards thoughtfully and responsibly, our Region will ensure the countryside line remains intact for years to come.

Debbie Chapman | debbiechapman@execulink.com | www.debbiechapman.ca

Response submitted August 1.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

The countryside line was introduced by Waterloo Region in 2003 for a reason. Its primary purpose is to control development and urban sprawl. I grew up just behind Westmount Public School at a time when Westmount road marked the urban / rural divide. In fact I had a friend who lived about 1 kilometer up Glasgow and to get there felt like driving deep into the countryside on a gravel road. My, how things have changed! I strongly believe that building up rather than out, is in the best interest of rural and urban populations. Setting geographical limits and respecting those limits of urban expansion are the only ways to ensure that cities stop expanding into rural areas. Rural farmland is what feeds us and what creates healthier communities. By reducing our personal ecological footprint (eg. buying local produce at the local markets, Bailey’s Local Foods and the many food basket offerings) and the city’s ecological footprint (building up) we contribute to reducing greenhouse gasses, a primary cause of global warming. I am committed to defending the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that would threaten farmland.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I will speak up against boundary expansions and modifications to the Official Plan. I will substantiate my position by referencing Provincial, Regional and City guidelines and legislation that set those limits in the first place. I will contest proposals that encroach on the Waterloo moraine or that threaten sources of our drinking water. The population is growing, but further sprawl is out of the question.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

While some developers object to the countryside line, it is not negotiable. Waterloo Region can plan for new development by building up and not out. Developers do not always represent our interests and for this reason I have included in my platform an overview of how building up needs to be done responsibly and needs to take into consideration established neighbourhoods, green spaces, the tree canopy, urban forest etc. I advocate bringing citizens to the table and giving them a voice in the decision-making process, something that I believe will serve to ensure that we get it right. We all have a stake in this.

Tia Rebecca Driver | driverward9@gmail.com |

Response submitted July 29.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/tia_driver/status/1024044805494460417

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I was fortunate to grow-up both rural and urban environments. My family lived Tavistock for almost 9 years and I attended Waterloo-Oxford District Secondary School. It is imperative to protect our rural landscape, it would be irresponsible not to. If elected, I would promote the protection of our rural landscape, culture and heritage. For me, it’s not just about land, it’s also about rural livelihoods.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

There needs to be knowledge sharing and integration between rural residents, regional and municipal councils. In order to protect farmland, drinking water and the moraine, there must be a common understanding regarding best practices and responsibility must be taken on both sides. I have a background in fluvial morphology (stream/river studies). Additionally, I have volunteered with the Laurel Creek Citizens Working Group for almost 3 years. I am well aware of the impact nutrients have and the modifications made to our our waterways. I would work with all stakeholders to address these issues.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

As a Kitchener City Councillor, I would push to include more comprehensive sustainable development practices for new developments. We ought to build upward and not outward, but we should not turn a blind-eye to the need for accessible and affordable housing.

Philip Molto | philip.molto@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Steve Strohack | ward9strohack@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Kitchener – Ward 10

Sarah Marsh | sarah@sarahmarsh.ca | sarahmarsh.ca

Response submitted September 7.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I fully support holding the countryside line, and I vow to defend the borders of Kitchener's Official Plan.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I will protect prime agricultural areas by implementing and following intensification targets so we grow more densely and slow down greenfield development. Protecting our watershed is another component of protecting our farmland and our drinking water source, and I am proud of Kitchener's storm water utility model, because we encourage residents to divert rain water from the storm water system, decreasing the amount of run-off entering our system. Despite the fact that we have no direct jurisdiction over the Waterloo moraine, I will advocate with our municipal partners within the Region to protect it. I take seriously the human right to clean drinking water, and in our role, city councillors are personally liable for ensuring we are utilizing best practices to protect our drinking water. We have aging pipes underground, so we need to invest in replacing them in a timely and efficient way to maintain our high standards of delivering clean water.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

One of my main priorities is Smart Urban Growth. As our population grows, we need to ensure sufficient active transportation options, provide more affordable housing options, and protect the integrity of our established core neighbourhoods. We need to ensure high quality urban design to create buildings, streets, and open spaces that are both functional and inspiring for years to come.

Peter Meier | pnpmeier@yahoo.ca | petermeier.ca

No response provided yet.


Waterloo

Waterloo – Mayor

Dave Jaworsky | jaworsky2018@gmail.com |

Response submitted September 4.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

The true beauty of Waterloo Region is the pairing of our vibrant urban fabric with our rural roots. The countryside line is the key to keeping this advantage. You can see one hundred years into the future at Perimeter Institute, or one hundred years into past, just a few kilometres north, with our Mennonite heritage. I value this juxtaposition and believe it gives Waterloo Region an economic development edge, by enhancing our quality of life. Earlier this year, the Province asked for input on expanding the Green Belt to our area. As a regional councillor, I supported the staff analysis and response, which stated that our Official Plan has higher standards in some instances, and if the Green Belt is applied as-is, it could weaken what we have. A complementary solution would be better, than a one-or-the-other approach. The City supported the recently published book by the Greater KW Chamber of Commerce “Country Roots, Global Reach”, which emphasizes our urban/rural fabric. I regularly offer this as a gift to officials visiting the city, so the unique urban/rural story of Waterloo Region can travel the globe.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Before I became mayor, I asked myself: What do humans truly value? Family, friends, fresh food, clean air, health, safety, education and of course, clean water came out on top. The rain that falls on the Waterloo moraine is filtered by nature, and six weeks later, it becomes our drinking water supplied from a well located behind Waterloo City Hall. Thanks to the protection of the moraine and increased protection efforts for the Grand River, our community has solidified our access to clean drinking water forever. Also, people have become increasingly aware of the value of fresh food, especially local produce. For citizens to have these things we value most, such as clean water and fresh food, in my role as an elected official, I have to protect the moraine and prime agricultural lands. For new housing, this means ending the horizontal sprawl at the city border, and focus on growing vertically instead.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

In the City of Waterloo, it means making better use of the land we have, through respectful intensification. Our LRT station areas are excellent locations for better usage, yet the three northern stations (R+T Park, Northfield, Conestoga) are overwhelmingly zoned for office and industrial uses. I want to create walkable community areas that embrace the ‘live-work-play’ feeling of Uptown Waterloo. To achieve a forward- looking mixed-use built environment, the Region will begin a Municipal Comprehensive Review on employment lands in 2019. I will be advocating for allowing mixed-use development in those areas. With sprawl, you really have one travel option: the car. Intensification means that many more travel options become viable, including walking, cycling, bus, and light rail transit. This term, city council added Multi-Modal Transportation as a strategic pillar for the first time. I will advocate for that pillar to continue, as we need the infrastructure to better support these choices. During road reconstruction, I will look for a ‘complete streets’ approach, enabling all forms of transportation by making sure all streets are designed to safely handle all types of traffic, including cars, trucks, buses, cyclists and pedestrians. Our active transportation trail system in Waterloo is coming along nicely. Next term, as mayor, I want to prioritize filling in the gaps and creating what I call “Supertrails” that offer safe ways to travel across the city using active transportation (walking and biking). I’d like to see these trails separated from vehicle traffic as much as possible.

Kelly Steiss | kellyisteiss@outlook.com |

General Answer

https://twitter.com/KellySteiss/status/1024479312777334784

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Chris Kolednik | votechrisk@gmail.com |

Response submitted July 29.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/VoteChrisK/status/1023935337796497413

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I will 100% support and defend the countryside line against any proposed amendments and updates to the official plan. I believe rural communities and cities both have their place in this country and community and we should be supportive of both. Yourselves and your neighbours work extremely hard, work long hours, and are committed to growing food that feed our local citizens and this should be respected without the encroachment of future subdivisions coming closer to these important lands we all cherish.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

As someone who sells commercial real estate for a living, and has been in real estate the past decade, there's always a pressing need from developers who want to swallow up prime agricultural areas for development and make a quick buck. We need to be unequivocal in that the Region will protect these areas, and that both communities can work together while protecting our farmlands and farmers who supply food to our local communities. The protection of the environment and drinking water is undoubtedly a concern to all of us, not just those on the fringes. I believe the Region of Waterloo has demonstrated a concern already that addresses the protection of safe drinking water. At the end of the day, if we can't protect the water we drink, we've ultimately failed our citizens and our community.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

There's obviously no easy answer for this. I left a community meeting today that will have a direct impact on the Uptown Waterloo community, based on the new zoning changes. This new proposed zoning in the City of Waterloo, which is set to pass on August 13th will have a direct impact on Waterloo's Citizens. The new zoning will allow high-rise condominiums to be built in neighbourhoods that are currently occupied by residential homes. Any developer can come in and door knock these homes and pay each homeowner a million dollars for example, and as long as the development fits the zoning by-laws the development could pass and uproot communities that have been there for decades. These homeowners and residents are very concerned about this. It almost seems that Waterloo's current council and Mayor are selling out our citizens for a few more tax dollars while having more shoe box style condo's in the air! Moreover, with the LRT coming on board (hopefully) shortly, we've already seen the intensification happen in both the Waterloo and Kitchener downtown cores. I think we need to focus on these parts but with a slower trajectory. Some of these new proposed developments make zero sense and will block out the sun on many parts of King St that was previously there for decades. I believe in growth, especially as a commercial realtor, as we need to focus on jobs as well, but rapid development is necessarily a good thing when we lose our identity as a city and as a region

Waterloo – Ward 1

Sandra Hanmer | sandra@hanmer.ca |

No response provided yet.

Adam McCarthy | adam_mccarthy@rogers.com | www.adammccarthyward1.com

Response submitted August 8.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

The Region of Waterloo’s Official Plan may need to address amendments or updates in the future, but as a resident of the Western side of Waterloo, I have seen first-hand the impact of urban development and know how crucial maintaining a balance against unnecessary sprawl must be. Although it’s difficult to estimate all future development challenges, our priority has to be the protection of our remaining agricultural areas, wetlands and parks.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I feel that the best way to protect sensitive areas and to make productive decisions on behalf of the community, is to understand the issues of all stakeholders before committing to a position or strategy. Becoming informed can only be done by joining committees such as the Waterloo Region Landfill Liaison Committee (WRLLC) that offers outreach to Regional Council, local residents and the Ministry of the Environment. Since this past Spring, I have been thoroughly impressed with the professional work done by the Waste Management Division and the passion displayed by other Committee Members. Topics such as: Gas System Flow Reports, Groundwater Extraction Operations, Leachate Monitoring, Well Water Sampling all contribute to our understanding of the sensitive nature of our rural resources. Protecting these resources makes sense ecologically and economically.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Ward 1 has seen recent challenges when it comes to urban development. Growth on the West side of Ira Needles has increased traffic flow, waste output, land development and infrastructure demands. Developers in the Beechwood Area have requested zoning for a multi-story building which has created controversy for the local residents. Although a clear effort has been made to maintain a balance between development and protecting our rural areas, our region’s growth will constantly challenge these guidelines and priorities. The motto “Growing up, instead of growing out” makes a great deal of sense. The choices for these developments will have to be made on a case by case basis, but should respect the integrity of each neighbourhood, and should not compromise the delicate nature of our remaining rural resources.

Robert Parent | robparentward1@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Xia (Leia) Lei | leilei.xlei@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Ranier Neufeld | rainern@remax.net |

Response submitted July 29.

General Answer

That is certainly a good discussion primer It’s a real challenge with a lot of moving parts. Generally speaking I’m in favour of intelligent development that is : - synergistic with the fabric of existing communities and sensible within the ‘case by case’ context of the neighborhood. - within our existing boundary as this is generally a more efficient utilization of existing infrastructure & therefore the tax payers’ dollar. with regard to the Waterloo Moraine : quite simply : we can rely on the Waterloo Moraine for our water needs only up to it’s natural capacity to regenerate itself. Anything else makes no sense in the long run. Question to ‘ Hold The Line ‘ crew : How do you propose to work with municipal council towards these outcomes ?

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Waterloo – Ward 2

Royce Bodaly | royce@roycebodaly.ca | roycebodaly.ca

Response submitted September 5.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes, I will defend the countryside line against any amendments that threaten to weaken it's protection. As a resident of Ward 2 and a parent with a child at Vista Hills Public School, I can see that we are reaching the boundaries of the city. It is clear that we need to follow the Official Plan as it currently exists, with thoughtful development that promotes growth in the nodes and corridors of the city in order to protect the environment and prevent further urban sprawl into our rural communities.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I will work with like minded council members and local advocates to protect these areas from further development. The Waterloo moraine is an important source of drinking water for our city and is extraordinarily important to protect from over-development. The Region of Waterloo estimates that an additional 100,000 residents will choose to live in our region by 2031. Managing that growth in a responsible way will be a very important job for our next council. The temptation will be to continue to grow outwardly, but I believe protecting our rural/urban mix and more importantly protecting our drinking water requires thoughtful growth in the City of Waterloo.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

New development in Waterloo Region needs to be focused on thoughtful intensification in order to accommodate the estimated growth going forward. It is clear that the city will need to grow up as opposed to out. Doing so along the ION and in other nodes and corridors of the city will help us prevent urban sprawl and help our community feel connected to the vibrant core of the city.

Janice Moore | janice.moore9315@gmail.com | janicemoore.ca

Response submitted August 2.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/janbeth50/status/1025008608998830083

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I absolutely defend the countryline and adhere to the"Hold the line" to the guidelines set up in 2003.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

In order to protect our moraine and agricultural areas, we need to have strong policies at City Hall. The protection of the countryline should be a part of our overall strategic plan and official plan for the city. This will give us the strongest position as a City to support this line in all our decision making. As an elected official, I will do my part to ensure that our guiding documents support the countryline.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

I believe we as a region are already considering the implications of growth that provides for growing up instead of growing out, but we need a stronger vision of what we want the growth to look like. The vision should give consideration to growth that fits with the existing neighbourhoods of our city, and takes into consideration, what will work for that neighbourhood. The vision should consider safety, accessibility, and walk-ability.. Policies on parking, relaxed policies on maximum density, property tax reform are just a few policies that can help to guide this vision. As a City Councillor we need to build this vision.

Xin Tan | xtanforw2@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

John Arthur McCarthy | johnmccarthy4ward2@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Waterloo – Ward 3

Angela Vieth | angela@angelavieth.ca |

No response provided yet.

Kim Eckel | gkeckel@sympatico.ca |

No response provided yet.

Waterloo – Ward 4

Diane Freeman | diane@dianefreeman.ca | www.dianefreeman.ca

Response submitted September 4.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

The City of Waterloo Official Plan (OP) was approved in 2012 and the Comprehensive By-laws that implement the OP are scheduled to come to Council September 10, 2018. These documents demonstrate the continued support of me and the City of Waterloo to honour the countryside line. As well, the OP clearly outlines the desire to grow “up” not “out” in Waterloo.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I have a history of support from the Council table related to the protection of prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water sources. These include the following: · Protection of the McNally lands (located in the Waterloo Moraine) in 2006 and again in conjunction with the Comprehensive By-law review in 2018 · Supported the approval of the Official Plan · Consistently meet with citizens related to issues associated with protecting the environment in and around Conservation Road, Wilmot line and Wideman Road · I actively track issues associated with the Laurel creek watershed · I was an active participant in finding solutions associated with the westside development lands as it related to groundwater recharge.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Within the City of Waterloo we need to remain focused on the intensified growth that is planned for through the City’s height and density plan, nodes and corridors plan and transit orientated development. The countryside line is a hard boundary in my mind and I will continue to honour this line as approved in our OP and other associated planning documents.

Liangan Yin | |

No response provided yet.

Waterloo – Ward 5

Jen Vasic | jenvasic@gmail.com | https://jenvasicwaterloo.ca/

Response submitted July 30.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/jenvasic/status/1024001076922441729

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes!

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

We must work together in the best interest of the land and water that sustains us. I will work with councillors from the cities, townships, and region, farmers, developers, experts, and other interested citizens to make sure that different points of view are heard and that these points of view influence decision-making. Most importantly, I will keep reconciliation with Indigenous nations and persons front of mind at all stages of relationship development, research, planning, and decision-making.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

In planning for new development, Waterloo Region requires a bold vision. This vision would recognize the value of urban development to our growing population, while also ensuring that developers are not driving the bus. This vision must also consider how development can promote equality and equity, as well as protect and respect the natural environment. This planning process would involve lots of consultation with many people early on and would use many different strategies (i.e., online surveys, at community centres, in public spaces, through councillor's newsletters, etc.).

Waterloo – Ward 6

Jeff Henry | jeff@jeffhenry.ca | jeffhenry.ca

Response submitted July 30.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

The countryside line in the Region of Waterloo Official Plan was a hard-fought victory that protects our water and our farmland while directing that new growth creates more compact and cost-efficient communities. I support this decision and will use all the tools available as a city councillor to defend this important accomplishment.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

While the City of Waterloo is not a host of prime agricultural areas, I was proud to approve a new Official Plan in 2012 that protected our region's prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and our drinking water. The plan directed growth primarily inwards, incorporated the Region's countryside line and protections of natural areas like the ESPAs (Environmentally Sensitive Policy Areas), and provided the basis for protecting other key environmental features across our city. I support the city's approach to acquiring privately owned natural areas through development applications and through direct purchases because public ownership is the best long-term protection. I will also continue to fund stormwater renewal projects that include rehabilitating and, where appropriate, renaturalizing our streams and ponds to improve water quality, fish habitats, and flood protection. We have already done great work in many parts of Clair Creek and the upper reaches of Laurel Creek while work has been planned for Maple Hill Creek and in Waterloo Park.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

We need to continue our long-standing strategic approach to intensification in nodes and corridors, including around new LRT stations, as it has created a vibrant Uptown and encouraged transit-supportive densities in areas across the city. This approach to more compact and connected growth has slowed outward growth to protect our countryside and our water, is more cost-efficient by using our existing infrastructure, and is a key building block to creating complete communities that have amenities within a reasonable walking and cycling distance for more people. I also support using inclusionary zoning as a tool to require developers to build more moderately priced units as part of larger developments, which is a key component in making sure everyone can find an affordable place to live in Waterloo.

William Hodgins | whodgins2018@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Oliver Campbell | olivercampbell.ward6@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Waterloo – Ward 7

Devon McKenzie | (contact form) | www.devonmckenzie.com

No response provided yet.

Rami Said | info@ramisaid.ca | www.ramisaid.ca

No response provided yet.

Tenille Bonoguore | tenilleb2018@gmail.com | www.tenilleb.com

Response submitted July 31.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/TenilleUptown/status/1023981826031927296 Thanks so much for reaching out, and for doing this work maintaining awareness of the countryside line. A couple of you know me from other projects (Alternatives Journal, the Grand Porch Party), so you can probably guess this is very dear to my heart.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Absolutely. The firm countryside line is one of the most important achievements for our City and Region. Holding the line not only prevents sprawl (and the associated infrastructure costs), it protects our watershed, sustains food production, and supports biodiversity. As the Councillor for Uptown-Ward 7, I will adamantly defend the Line.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

As a reporter, a volunteer, a community organizer and a mom, my driving passions are sustainability, environment, and social equity. The pop-up music festival I started – the Grand Porch Party – was specifically designed to raise awareness about water issues: not only is the GPP named after our major river, it is held each year on Canadian Rivers Day. (Also, I grew up in Australia, where water issues are a very tangible concern.) I will bring to Council a strong understanding of environmental issues, a background in environmental science reporting, and a history of involvement in pragmatic environmental action for the common good. As the City Councillor for Uptown Waterloo, some of the most direct support I can offer is to encourage ongoing infill development that maintains a human scale and includes varied housing options in order to provide a broader range of affordability. I will also engage with my City and Regional counterparts on ways to protect our watershed, and with groups like Hold the Line and Climate Action Waterloo Region to achieve our sustainability targets and maintain our environment supports.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

There’s no doubt: we need to build in and up. For residential, I would like to see more mid-rise developments in Waterloo Region, and more flexibility for varied housing options within neighbourhoods. Ideally, the design of infill development complements the feel of existing neighbourhoods, while increasing density and providing more options in terms of pricing. Industrial and commercial development is also essential. I would encourage an infill approach here, too, with repurposing of existing buildings or imaginative re-use of underused land. We’re already seeing this occur along the LRT line (which has the added benefit of offering people a variety of transportation options). Ideally, this is just the beginning.

Carol Parsons | carol@carolparsons.ca | carolparsons.ca

No response provided yet.

Elizabeth Sproule | elizabethsprouleward7@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.


North Dumfries

North Dumfries – Mayor

Sue Foxton | susan.foxton@outlook.com |

Response submitted August 1.

General Answer

I will defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections. I will be a voice to continue to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo Moraine and drinking water. We cannot allow sprawl into our farmland, the countryside line is essential, working together with the regional partners we must continue to be a voice of protection. We cherish our Region and its diversity, it is our legacy and our future.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

North Dumfries – Ward 1

Rodney Rolleman | rod@schooltee.com |

No response provided yet.

North Dumfries – Ward 2

Sheila Harrison | |

No response provided yet.

Derrick Ostner | d.ostner@bellnet.ca |

No response provided yet.

North Dumfries – Ward 3

Paul H. Cabral | PHC@sympatico.ca | www.paulhcabral.ca

No response provided yet.

John Clarke | johnc361947@yahoo.ca |

No response provided yet.

Margaret McCreery | margaret@mccreeryw3.com | www.mccreeryw3.com

Response submitted August 16.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes, as a Councillor for North Dumfries Township I will advocate to preserve the countryside line and the protections it provides to rural areas. Productive farmland, safe drinking water and beautiful natural areas cannot be taken for granted.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

The Mayor of North Dumfries is the Township’s representative on Regional Council. As a Township Councillor I will encourage the Mayor to support and defend the countryside line at the Regional Council table. I will also engage with and encourage local advocacy groups such as Hold the Line WR in their efforts to bring the public’s attention to the importance of this initiative to the Township and the entire Waterloo Region. I do not see a reason to change course from the current Official Plan.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

The current Official Plan offers a sound framework to deal with future growth in a balanced manner. In North Dumfries prime agricultural land and natural areas are protected while new housing develpments are clustered around existing urban settlements. There is also an area designated for business development to bring employment opportunities to the Township. The current Official Plan has a well rounded approach that will smartly manage development for years to come and it does not have to be changed.

North Dumfries – Ward 4

Pamela Gillespie | pam.gillespie@bell.net |

No response provided yet.

Neil Ritchie | neilritchie4ward4@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Dawna Ward | dawnaward4@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.


Wilmot

Wilmot – Mayor

Les Armstrong | |

No response provided yet.

John Jordan | john@johnjordan.ca |

No response provided yet.

Wilmot – Ward 1

Angie Hallman | ahallmanrmt@cwisp.ca |

General Answer

https://twitter.com/AngieHallman/status/1024044755024596993

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Rose Mailloux | mailloux.rp@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Wilmot – Ward 2

Cheryl Gordijk | cherylgordijkward2@gmail.com | www.votecheryl.com

Response submitted September 4.

General Answer

https://twitter.com/Cheryl4Ward2/status/1024302260002676737

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Wilmot township has a large agricultural base, most of which is on the boundaries of the township. There is a very small percentage of prime land that is suitable for food production, much of it within Wilmot, and we cannot afford to lose any of it. I think it is prudent to maintain vigilance to maintain our countryside line and also ensure our vulnerable wetlands, aquifer and wildlife protections are not eroded.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

This is an area where I need to learn more in order to form a more informed opinion.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

There are limited options in the township for us to accommodate too much residential growth, partly due to the spread out nature of the area, as well as its unique environmental character. I would be wary of unchecked growth in our rural areas that would have an unwelcome effect on our unique environment. It's important that we protect our communities while recognizing that growth in neighbouring municipalities could have an impact on us here in Wilmot (for example, from increased traffic).

Wilmot – Ward 3

Kris Badrinarayan | kris@krishnakb.ca | http://www.krishnakb.ca

Response submitted July 31.

General Answer

My in-laws are rice farmers. As such, I do have an interest in farmers and their livelihood. I trust this helps and we can meet to address all of your concerns.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Barry Fisher | badenoutlook@hotmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Sharon MacKenzie | smackenziemack@gmail.com | http://shazmack.wixsite.com/votesharonmackenzie

Response submitted September 5.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I recognize how important our country side and rural areas are to our community, and I will do my upmost to protect the countryside line; responsible growth to our community and at a reasonable rate.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

This is an area where I would like to be able to do more research in order to give a more informed response (e.g., what are the current initiative and future plans?). My line of inquiry would be, do we have enough water to sustain the the current and future growth to our community?

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Baden is a growing community, and as I have reached out to the residents of Baden over the past 2 months I have listened and share their concerns; that being the concern around responsible growth while maintaining a small town feel.

Wilmot – Ward 4

Jeff Gerber | jeff@jeffgerber.ca |

Response submitted August 4.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Yes! As a member of Wilmot Council for over 10 years I have been active in maintaining the countryside line and protecting our farmland and rural lifestyle in Wilmot Township.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

In my time on Council we have been diligent in protecting the countryside line, which in turn protects farmland. For example, we made sure that residential traffic from new subdivisions adjacent to the Wilmot Line was contained in the city and that no traffic connections were made to the Wilmot Line. In our recent Township Official Plan review and update we confirmed our commitment to the countryside line and protecting farmland within Wilmot while allowing for focused growth.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Intensification in existing urban areas already designated residential is a major key in accommodating growth and maintaining the countryside line. In Wilmot we have been pro-active in allowing for common sense intensification in our settlement areas as well. This way growth is not limited to just new greenfield development. Intensification also helps provide the economies of scale that support important infrastructure, like public transit.

Steven Martin | mail@stevenmartin.ca |

Response submitted September 7.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I will do my best to protect the countryside line. It is important to not let the urban sprawl take away our valuable farm land. It is also important to protect the drinking water and to be concerned about drainage into the streams, and rivers. I want to defend the land including the natural moraines, or natural spaces. There needs to be room for wildlife, and for marshes that help with water flow. Protecting the countryside line from development is a concern of mine.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I will work to protect agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water by paying attention to development requests, and not support development that would infringe on these areas. I would vote against and campaign against development that would encroach on these areas.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

As our population grows, we need to build up. There can be more development in the downtown areas. There are ways to use the areas that have already been developed in the past, and can be refurbished or added to rather than building out and taking away more rural land. Redesigning industrial areas that are no longer used is one way to provided more space for a growing population. Talking with people about values and needs, and helping people to see that individuals don’t have to take away agricultural land for individual enjoyment. There can be discussions about natural spaces for the whole community to enjoy, which is good for many people.

Mark Murray | mark@murraysclothing.ca |

No response provided yet.

Jennifer Pfenning | jenn4wilmot@gmail.com | www.jenn4wilmot.ca

Response submitted July 29.

General Answer

(Note: Pfenning's Organic Farm is a sponsor of Hold The Line 2018. Sponsorship was secured before Jennifer Pfenning announced her intent to run as a candidate.) Let me first say that I had signed up to participate in the event before deciding to run for council. As a candidate, my perspective on this is that development needs to be allowed in a responsible and balanced way, enabling us to protect food lands and wild areas while continuing to meet the needs of a growing population. Those lands that are most fertile and capable of producing the food we eat should be protected vigorously. I would like to see us rank lands and develop our urban planning around that ranking. It sounds simple but of course the details are not. It is a project I have long talked of with my family and wider food community. I have supported the countryside line since I first heard of it while sitting on the Waterloo Region Food System Roundtable. Thank you for working to keep our region vibrant and healthy!

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?


Wellesley

Wellesley – Mayor

Joe Nowak | joebarb.nowak@gmail.com |

Response submitted September 4.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

I will defend the Countryside Line. With 90 % of our lands considered "prime agricultural" and, when you add in our natural areas, 96% could be considered green space. The natural areas are home to deer, fox, wild turkeys, brown trout and more. To me, Wellesley Township is paradise. I will work to make sure it is not "paradise lost".

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

When the Region proposed to designate a significant amount of our lands as an ESL (Environmentally Sensitive Landscape) and as a member of Township Council at that time, I was in full support of the initiative despite strong opposition from the "Stop the ESL" landowners. Much of that area is a major recharge area for Regional water supply. Better education may be the key. I will encourage significant public consultation as we work through the Municipal Comprehensive Review (MCR). I have had discussions with the folks at RARE about this issue and have invited them to have a greater presence in our Township. We must preserve, protect and enhance our natural areas. I will oppose any consideration of industrializing our rural landscapes.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

The approach that the Region has taken is working well. With over $2 billion in investment along the ION corridor, this intensification has mitigated the need for additional residential development in our Township. Still, the demand is high in rural areas which is reflected in prices paid for housing. In the short term, we must work with builders and developers to provide a better mix of both entry-level and senior-friendly housing on available lands within the Countryside Line. Estate-type lots must be a thing of the past. Through this OP (Official Plan) review process, I would expect to see significant pressure applied to Regional Council by home builders and developers to expand the Countryside Line. When we discuss Wellesley Township, I will encourage Regional Council to stand firm against any such proposal.

Bernia Wheaton | bernia.wheaton@gmail.com |

Response submitted September 11.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

The foundation for the Official Plan is influenced by the Provincial Policy Statement to ensure that development does not interfere with natural and agricultural resources. I believe that the PPS and the OP both indicate that growth and development is important to our economic prosperity and the building of strong, resilient communities. As a rural township, we need to ensure that there is a balance of protected agricultural land, and the opportunity for development in our settlements areas.

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

I would work with the Planning staff to ensure that development on rural properties is focused on value-added, on-farm diversified uses. As is allowed through the PPS, economic opportunities should be encouraged as long as they don't negatively impact the long term cultivation of prime agricultural lands. Through source water protection and the responsible use of alternatives to road salt, we can preserve our drinking water while maintaining safe roads.

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

We need to plan for and promote the need for a mix of housing development including higher density town homes, more affordable semi-detached homes, and bungalow style homes on smaller lots for seniors who want to stay in the community without the cost or workload of a detached home with a large lot. We need to make better use of the land within our cities and settlement areas, ensuring that vacant lots and brownfield lots are utilized in favour of urban sprawl. Intensification and redevelopment should be a priority, while maintaining our rural character and amenities.

Wellesley – Ward 1

Shelley Wagner | shelleywagner7@hotmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Wellesley – Ward 2

Herb Neher | |

No response provided yet.

Mark Witmer | mwplum@execulink.com |

No response provided yet.

Wellesley – Ward 3

Peter van der Maas | vandermaas14@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Joyce Barker | joycebarker04@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Grant Kingsbury | grantbk@yahoo.ca |

No response provided yet.

Philip Morris | phjamo@hotmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Wellesley – Ward 4

Carl Smit | csmit@rogers.com |

No response provided yet.


Woolwich

Woolwich – Mayor

Sandy Shantz | |

No response provided yet.

Woolwich – Ward 1

Julie-Anne Herteis | jaherteis@live.com |

No response provided yet.

Scott McMillan | mcmillan.scott.da@gmail.com |

Response submitted July 29.

General Answer

I am against sprawling development and I'm interested in learning more about group.

Q1: Will you defend the countryside line against amendments and updates to the Official Plan that threaten to weaken its protections?

Q2: How will you work to protect prime agricultural areas, the Waterloo moraine, and drinking water?

Q3: As our population grows, how should Waterloo Region plan for new development?

Patrick Merlihan | pat@merlihan.com | www.merlihan.com

No response provided yet.

Woolwich – Ward 2

Fred Redekop | fred.redekop@gmail.com |

No response provided yet.

Eric Schwindt | eschwindt@rogers.com |

No response provided yet.

Woolwich – Ward 3

Murray Martin | mgmartin@hotmail.ca |

No response provided yet.

Larry Shantz | lrshantz@gmail.com | www.larryshantz.ca

No response provided yet.

Join the Movement

We are asking for your email and phone number. We promise to:

  1. Never give, sell, or trade your information to third parties. Not even for jade eggs or superpowers.

  2. Only reach out by text or phone if there is a direct threat to the Line or an opportunity to enhance it. Email will be used sparingly for event invites, general information, and calls to action.

Name *
Name
Phone
Phone
I support the countryside line. Our farmland, drinking water, and natural areas are too precious to pave over.
Tweet This      Share on Facebook
This municipal election, I will vote for candidates who will keep the countryside line. This made-in-Waterloo Region policy should be celebrated and strengthened.
Tweet This      Share on Facebook